Birney T. “Chick” Havey

Chic_Havey_soldierPFC Havey is a World War II combat veteran from St. Louis, Missouri, who served in the 42 “Rainbow” Division, 222nd Infantry Anti-Tank Company as a combat paratrooper. Chick was the tip of the “spear”.

Chick earned three battle stars, in combat at the Battle of Northern France, the Battle of the Bulge and Task Force Linden under General Patton’s 3rd Army and the Invasion of Germany, including the liberation of the Dachau Concentration Camp in April 1945.

Highly decorated Chick earned:

  1. 1
    The
    silverStar

    CITATION

    AWARD OF THE SILVER STAR

    Award of the Silver Star Medal by the direction of the President under the provisions of the Army regulations 800-45 22 September 43 as amended the Silver Star Medal is awarded to:
    Birney T. Havey JR.

    17075652 Private First Class Infantry Anti Tank Company 222 Infantry.
    For Gallantry in Action 23 February 1945 in Sweighausen, France.

    When at dawn a German Army platoon attacked our position in Wigen–sur-Moder. Under heavy machine gun fire along with a mortar barrage, two enemy soldiers blew open the front door of the house we were in, PFC Havey PVT Dickey PVT Crews were defending with rifle fire, stationed on the first stair landing PFC Havey killed the first two German soldiers entering the front door, one fell in one fell out of the door, going to a front window PFC Havey launched a grenade into a German machine gun nest, set up and firing just outside, killing and wounding all three enemy, our tank counter attack cleared the town, a few hours later, where our squad was relieved and continued to defend Sweighausen our M.L. R.
    Entered military service from St. Louis, Missouri.

     

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    The

    BronzeStar_Set2CITATION

    AWARD OF THE BRONZE STAR MEDAL

    By the direction of the President, under the provisions of Army Regulations800-45, 23 September 1943, as amended, the Bronze Star Medal is awarded to: Birney T. Havey JR.

    17075652, Private First Class, Infantry, Anti-Tank Company, 222nd Infantry for heroic achievement in action on 20 March 1945, near Ludwigswinkel, Germany.

    When our forces were pinned down by intense machine gun and rifle fire while advancing through the Siegfried Line, Private Havey volunteered to advance on a reconnaissance for routes to by-pass the position of resistance. As fire from one machine gun became so heavy that he could advance no further, he crawled to the left flank of the emplacement and threw a hand grenade into the midst of the crew, killing two forcing a third to flee. Private Havey’s heroism and courage opened a path for our advancing forces to flank the other enemy positions unmolested.
    Entered military service from St. Louis, Missouri.

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    The
     purpleheartThe Purple Heart is a United States military decoration awarded in the name of the President to those who have been wounded or killed while serving on or after April 5, 1917 with the U.S. military. With its forerunner, the Badge of Military Merit, which took the form of a heart made of purple cloth, the Purple Heart is the oldest military award that is still given to members of the U.S. military, the only earlier award being the obsolete Fidelity Medallion. The National Purple Heart Hall of Honor is located in New Windsor, New York. 
  4. 4
    The
    GoodConductMedalSetThe Good Conduct Medal is one of the oldest military awards of the United States Armed Forces. The Navy Good Conduct Medal was established in 1869, the Marine Corps version in 1896, the Coast Guard version in 1923, the Army version in 1941, and the Air Force version in 1963; the Air Force Good Conduct Medal was discontinued from February 2006 to February 2009.

     

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    The
    EuropeanAfricanMiddleEasternCampaignMedalSet

    The European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal is a military award of the United States Armed Forces which was first created on November 6, 1942 by Executive Order 9265 [1] issued by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The medal was intended to recognize those military service members who had performed military duty in the European Theater (to include North Africa and the Middle East) during the years of the Second World War. Colored bands representing Germany (on the ribbon’s left side), Italy (on the ribbon’s right side), and the United States (in the center of the ribbon) are visible in the ribbon. The brown and green areas of the ribbon represent the terrain of the area of conflict, which ranged from beaches and sand, to grass and woodlands, to mountains.
    Originally known as the “EAME Ribbon”, the European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal is awarded for any service performed between December 7, 1941 and March 2, 1946 provided such service was performed in the geographical theater areas of Europe, North Africa, or the Middle East. For those service members who participated in one or more military campaigns, Service stars are authorized to be worn on the medal. The Arrowhead device is also authorized to be worn on the medal for those who participated in airborne or amphibious assault landings; the Fleet Marine Force Combat Operation Insignia is also authorized for wear on the medal for sailors attached to the Marine Corps.

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    The

    WorldWarIIVictoryMedalSetThe World War II Victory Medal is a campaign medal of the United States military which was created by an act of Congress in July 1945. The medal commemorates military service during World War II and is awarded to any member of the United States military, including members of the armed forces of the Government of the Philippine Islands, who served on active duty, or as a reservist, between December 7, 1941 and December 31, 1946.
    The World War II Victory Medal was first issued as a service ribbon referred to as the “Victory Ribbon.” By 1946, a full medal had been established which was referred to as the World War II Victory Medal. The medal’s front depicts Nike standing victorious, holding a broken sword, representing the broken power of the Axis, with one foot upon the helmet of Mars, the Roman god of war, representing the end of the conflict. Behind Nike is a sunburst, representing the dawn of peace. The reverse recalls the “Four Freedoms” speech by President Roosevelt, with a laurel sprig, surrounded by the words “United States of America”, and the dates of formal US participation in the conflict, “1941-1945″. The edges of the suspension and service ribbon of the medal revisit the corresponding multicolored rainbow ribbons of the Allied World War I Victory Medal. This again honors all the allied nations. The wide red center represents the new sacrifice of blood by World War II combatants. The thin white lines separating the central red band from the outer multicolored bands represent the rays of new hope, two of them signifying that this was the second global conflict.
    There is no minimum service time limit for the issuance of the World War II Victory Medal, and the National Personnel Records Center has reported some cases of service members receiving the award for simply a few days of service. As the Second World War ended on September 2, 1945, there are also cases of service members, who had enlisted in 1946, receiving the medal without having been a veteran of World War II. The reason for this late date is that President Harry S. Truman did not declare an official end of hostilities until the last day of 1946.

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    The

    americanCampaignThe American Campaign Medal was a military award of the United States Armed Forces which was first created on November 6, 1942 by Executive Order 9265 issued by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Originally issued as the “American Theater Ribbon”, the medal was intended to recognize those service members who had performed duty in the American Theater of Operations during World War II. A similar medal, known as the American Defense Service Medal existed for American defense service prior to the United States entry into World War II.
    The requirements for the American Campaign Medal were: a service member was required to either perform one year of duty (cumulative) within the continental borders of the United States, or perform 30 days consecutive or 60 non-consecutive days of duty outside the borders of the United States but within the American Theater of Operations. The American Theater was defined as the entirety of the United States to include most of the Atlantic Ocean, a portion of Alaska, and a small portion of the Pacific bordering California and Baja California.[1] \
    The eligibility dates of the American Campaign Medal were from December 7, 1941 to March 2, 1946. Service stars were authorized to any service member who was engaged in actual combat with Axis forces within the American theater. This primarily applied to those members of the military which had engaged in anti-U-Boat patrols in the Atlantic.[2]
    The first recipient of the American Campaign Medal was General of the Army George C. Marshall.[3]

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    The

    ArmyOfOccupationMedalSetThe Army of Occupation of Germany Medal is a type of decoration of the United States military which was created by the (55 Stat. 781) act of the United States Congress on November 21, 1941. The decoration recognizes those members of the U.S. military who served in the European occupation force following the close of the First World War.[1]
    The medal is retroactive by design and is awarded to any service member who performed occupation garrison duty in either Germany, or the former Austria-Hungary, between the dates of November 12, 1918 and July 11, 1923. The medal was primarily created due to the rising tension with Germany, between 1939 and 1941, and also as a means to honor the World War I service of General of the Armies John J. Pershing, whose likeness appears on the actual medal. Initially the blue edge stripe was wavy, to signify the Rhine River, but that proved impractical to mass produce and was changed to a straight line.[2]
    The first Army of Occupation of Germany Medal was presented to General of the Armies Pershing with retroactive presentations made to any service member upon application to the United States War Department. Ironically, less than three weeks after the medal was first authorized, the United States was attacked at Pearl Harbor which led to another full-scale war with Germany, now allied with Japan. 

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    Presidential

    DistinguishedUnitEmblem

    By virtue of the authority vested in me as the President of the United States and as Commander in Chief of the Armed Forces of the United States, I have to awarded

    THE PRESIDENTIAL UNIT CITATION (ARMY) FOR EXTRAORDINARY HEROISM TO THE 222ND INFANTRY REGIMENT

    The 222nd Infantry Regiment is cited for extraordinary and outstanding performance of duty in action against the enemy on 24 and 25 January 1945, in the Bois D’Ohlungen and the vicinity of Schweighausen and Neuberg, France. On the night of 24 January 1945, the 222nd Infantry Regiment, under strength by half a Battalion of riflemen, yet necessarily extended over a 7500-yard front, was attacked by five regiments from the 7th Parachute, 25th Panzer and 47th German VG Divisions which were supported by heavy artillery. Ordered to hold at all cost, the Regiment withstood the enemy’s desperate bid to break the Seventh Army Moder River Line. Fighting back from ice-filled foxholes, the outnumbered defenders fought off wave after wave of enemy attacking all along the Regiment’s front and infiltrating into friendly positions, well behind the Main Line of Resistance. Wild fighting raged throughout the night and well into the next day as the fanatical attackers sought to break out into open country, but ever measure was met by determined counterattacks. On the night of 25th, the frustrated enemy fell back to his original line, leaving the ground littered with enemy dead. Despite the loss of 237 officers and men, the 222nd Infantry Regiment held its position, exacting a heavy toll of men and equipment from the enemy. The courage and devotions to duty shown by the members of the 222nd Infantry Regiment in smashing one of the enemy’s principle strategic efforts to reconquer Alsace, are worthy of emulation and exemplify the highest traditions of the Army of the United States.

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    Task

    Task-Force-LindenLinden was promoted to Brigadier General as Assistant Division Commander of the 42nd (Rainbow) Infantry Division. He commanded its three infantry regiments as “Task Force Linden” which arrived in Marseilles, France that fall, deployed in an attempt to prevent two German armies in Alsace from breaking out, and successfully defended along a 30-mile front. Two units of “Task Force Linden”, the 222nd Regiment and 1st Battalion 242nd Regiment, were awarded Presidential Unit Citations for extraordinary heroism.
    At the end of January, 1945 the rest of the division arrived in France, and as part of the Seventh Army the 42nd penetrated German defenses in the Haardt Mountains, crossed the Siegfried Line, bridged the Rhine River, and captured the cities of Wurzburg, Schweinfurt, Fürth and Donauworth. 

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    The

    CombatInfantryBadgeThe Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is the U.S. Army combat service recognition decoration awarded to Infantry or Special Forces soldiers—enlisted men and officers (commissioned and warrant) holding colonel rank or below, who personally fought in active ground combat while an assigned member of either an infantry or a Special Forces unit, of brigade size or smaller, any time after 6 December 1941. The CIB and its non-combat analogue, the infantry skill-recognition Expert Infantryman Badge (EIB) were simultaneously created during World War II to recognize the fact that out of all Army occupational specialties, infantrymen in combat face the greatest risk of being wounded or killed under fire. 

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    The

    USArmyBasicCombatParachuteBadgeThe Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is the U.S. Army combat service recognition decoration awarded to Infantry or Special Forces soldiers—enlisted men and officers (commissioned and warrant) holding colonel rank or below, who personally fought in active ground combat while an assigned member of either an infantry or a Special Forces unit, of brigade size or smaller, any time after 6 December 1941. The CIB and its non-combat analogue, the infantry skill-recognition Expert Infantryman Badge (EIB) were simultaneously created during World War II to recognize the fact that out of all Army occupational specialties, infantrymen in combat face the greatest risk of being wounded or killed under fire. 

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    Expert

    expertAllA Marksmanship Badge is a military badge of the United States Armed Forces or a U.S. Civilian badge which is presented to personnel upon successful completion of a weapons qualification course (known as Marksmanship Qualification Badges) or high placement in an official marksmanship competition (known as Marksmanship Competition Badges). The U.S. Military’s and Civilian Marksmanship Program’s (CMP) Marksmanship Qualification Badges are awarded in three grades (highest to lowest): Expert, Sharpshooter, and Marksman while their Marksmanship Competition Badges are typically awarded in gold, silver, and bronze or silver and bronze (service dependent). The National Rifle Association’s (NRA) Marksmanship Qualification Badges are awarded in six grades (highest to lowest): Distinguished Expert, Expert, Sharpshooter, Marksman First-Class, Marksman, and Pro-Marksman. The NRA’s Marksmanship Competition Badges are only awarded at one level (gold) with the exception of their Law Enforcement Distinguished Program which starts with the silver Excellence-in-Competition Badge and ends with the awarding of a Law Enforcement Distinguished Pistol Badge.
    The United States Army issues Marksmanship Qualification Badges for a variety of weapons while the United States Marine Corps only issues Marksmanship Qualification Badges for rifle and pistol, and the NRA for rifle, shotgun, and pistol.

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    Legion
     Legion of HonourThe Legion of Honour, full name National Order of the Legion of Honour, is the highest French order for military and civil merits, established 1802 byNapoléon Bonaparte. 

Chick is a great asset to WW2 ETO TOURS, with first-hand knowledge only a front line combat infantry man can give.